Vinyl Rhythms Listening Party

On 8 June 2017, Black Cultural Archives held Vinyl Rhythms listening party hosted by Sugar Dread, local Brixtonite, Vibes FM radio presenter, and Director of Rastafari Movement UK, and Gaffa Blue DJ/selector for First Class Sound and Killer Watt Sound, and Dubvendor.

Watch vinyl lovers share their memories and stories about music, from father-son trips to the renowned DubVendor to discovering the world of vinyl in 1980s in our hometown Brixton.

Audiences were asked to share their most iconic, classic and favourite vinyls, memories and stories. Cartèlea Howel from BCA Youth Forum interviewed audiences about their stories…

I interviewed a few people at this great event asking them why they chose the particular vinyl’s, and what memories did they have alongside! Although the weather was gloomy, the settings and atmosphere was well and truly set and it didn’t seem to bother people at all. It was a great event where there was great vibes, and just people bubbling and mingling, also sharing fond memories and stories.”

Rachel
Started collecting in the mid 80’s living in Brixton and where everything was really kicking off with the vinyl records. She bought a lot of vinyl records, all having the same certain rhythms. She also mentioned that this was a great event, and it was a way of getting people together in the older generation as there have been many venues that have been closed down in recent years.   

Nick
Nick was not really familiar with Reggae and Jamaican music at all; it was music such as Pink Floyd that he was more used to. Looking through his parents’ vinyl collection, he could not find a single thing. (Also, mentions his dad was Mexican, forgot what he said his mothers’ heritage was). Keen to get a bit more of an interest this type of genre, he started waking up at 4:30am and making his way down to Essex car boot sales, (as they had a good reputation) to try and find some authentic vinyl’s! After determination and drive, he came across a lady that had a large collection, and that is where his love for Jamaican music started, alongside getting taught by ‘Bionic’  teaching everything including roots reggae of the 70’s. 

 

Natalie
Natalie has fond memories of her father playing roots reggae and then got into sound systems, and the rest is history!

Duke
Was working for Phillips records as an engineer in 1961 – 1964, and then starting collecting vinyl’s when he started working for Decca records during 1964 – 1967, in the genre of popular reggae, jazz and pop music. 

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